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BOTANICAL NAME

Myrtus communis

 

COMMON NAME

Common myrtle

 

PLANT TYPE

Shrub, Evergreen

 

FAMILY

Myrtaceae

 

PLANT HEIGHT

10L pot

Eventual height and spread 3 m - 3 m

 

FEEDING

Fertilize once a year in early spring

 

WATERING

Regular, use rainwater

 

LIGHT CONDITIONS

Full to partial sun

 

PRUNING

After the bloom period

 

PEST

Generally pest free

 

DISEASES

Generally disease free

 

SOIL

Moist but well drained

 

TYPE

Ornamental Shrub

Myrtus communis

£34.80Price
Excluding Sales Tax
  • Myrtus communis, Common Myrtle, is an aromatic evergreen native to the Mediterranean.

     

    It has pointed, glossy leaves and sweet-scented flowers and can grow to 3m by 3m. The flowers are white with a hint of pink, appear from July to August, and have long stamens which make them look fluffy. These flowers are followed by small purple-black berries in autumn. Myrtus communis can be planted in a container, a raised bed, as a hedge or border, or as a standalone plant. Common Myrtle is unlikely to reach its full potential size if it is left outside over winter – some gardeners grow it in a container so they can move it indoors when the weather turns. Myrtle is an asset to many types of gardens, from coastal, to city, to cottage. It is drought tolerant, low maintenance, and good at filling out sunny, sheltered spaces. It’s best to give this plant full or partial sun and keep it away from cold winds. Water it regularly while it is young, but when it matures it will become drought resistant. Even if you’re growing it indoors, try and water your Myrtle with rainwater – it does not cope well with the high lime concentrations in tap water. When it’s growing outdoors, it needs to be in well-drained soil. When grown indoors, under glass, Common Myrtle should have good ventilation, be under filtered light, and in loam-based compost. True to its Mediterranean roots, Myrtle needs a long, hot summer to produce flowers and fruit. How much food your myrtle will need depends on where you are growing it. For outdoor plants, fertilizing once per year in early spring is enough. Indoors plants will need weekly liquid fertilizer during their growing season. Be sure to prune after the bloom period. If you want your common myrtle shrub to grow small, clean diseased wood and remove spent blooms.

     

    Myrtle is safe for pets and babies, and typically pest and disease free.

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