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BOTANICAL NAME

Ficus lyrata

 

COMMON NAME

Fiddle-leaf fig, Banjo fig

 

PLANT TYPE

Evergreen or Deciduous Trees, Shrubs or Climbers, Conservatory

 

FAMILY

Moraceae

 

PLANT HEIGHT

160 cm

 

FEEDING

Feed every two weeks with a balanced liquid fertiliser in spring and summer

 

WATERING

Moderate moisture

 

LIGHT CONDITIONS

Bright, filtered light

 

PRUNING

Remove old leaves to avoid infection

 

PEST

Glasshouse red spider mite, Thrips, Mealybugs and Scale insects

 

DISEASES

Brown spots on Fig leaves ccause by bacterial infection and fungal diseases, which are typically caused by lack of air-flow and too much moisture sitting on the leaves

 

SOIL

Loam based compost

 

AIR PURIFYING

Yes

 

CURIOSITY

So popular that retail stores produce polyester versions of the plant! Some think this is leading to "fiddle-leaf fatigue"

 

TYPE

House Plant

Ficus lyrata

£167.40Price
Excluding Sales Tax
  • Ficus lyrata is commonly known as the Fiddle-Leaf Fig or Banjo Fig. Their leaves are a distinctive shape with a narrow middle that makes them resemble a fiddle or lyre, which is how they get their nickname. The leaves have a leathery texture, with prominent veins and a wavy edge. It is a flowering plant that is part of the mulberry and fig family, Moraceae.

     

    Fiddle-Leaf Figs are native to the tropical rainforests of western Africa, from Cameroon to Sierra Leone. They can grow to between 12 and 15m tall when they’re in a rainforest, and they produce a green fig about 3cm across. Feed your Fiddle-Leaf Fig with a balanced liquid fertiliser every two weeks during spring and summer, and then only feed sparingly in winter. You can get fertilizers that are specially formulated for Fiddle-Leaf Figs. Fiddle-Leaf Figs like moderately moist, loam-based soil. They will let you know if they’re not getting enough water by wilting their leaves losing their bright green colour. If the soil gets waterlogged, the plant could lose leaves and get root rot, which can be fatal. Be sure to only water when the top inch of soil dries out and even less over winter. To avoid infection, any old, dry leaves should be removed. Cleaning the leaves with a damp cloth with improve their ability to photosynthesise.

     

    To look their best, Fiddle-Leaf Figs need filtered, bright light. If they have too little light them, they will not grow properly, but exposure to direct sunlight can scald the leaves. Ficus lyrata can irritates the skin so remember to wear gloves. This plant could make people and animals unwell if eaten.

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