ALL PICTURES SHOWN ARE FOR ILLUSTRATION PURPOSE ONLY. 

 

BOTANICAL NAME

Euphorbia characais 'Wulfenii'

 

COMMON NAME

Spurge

 

PLANT TYPE

Annuals, Perennials, Shrubs or Succulents, Evergreen

 

FAMILY

Euphorbiaceae

 

PLANT HEIGHT

3L pot

Eventual height 90 cm - 1.5 m

 

FEEDING

Do not require feeding or special care

 

WATERING

Does not handle long periods of drought well

 

LIGHT CONDITIONS

Dappled Shade, Partial Shade, Full Shade 

 

PRUNING

Cut back flowering shoots to ground level

 

PEST

Aphids

 

DISEASES

Grey moulds

 

SOIL

Moist but well-drained

 

TYPE

Exterior

Euphorbia characais 'Wulfenii'

£13.80Price
Excluding Sales Tax
  • Euphorbia is a large genus, with plants like Christmas Poinsettias, Cowboy Cacti, and large shrubs like Euphorbia mellifera. These shrubby, hardy varieties make excellent garden plants for a range of different situations. Euphorbias, also known as Spurge, are easy to grow, and they look fantastic in your garden all year round – an excellent addition!

     

    They grow to around 90cm in height, with a spread of around 1.5m. They add texture and structure to your planting scheme, and they are a great companion for any colourful perennials and shrubs you have. E. characais 'Wulfenii' is a spreading, evergreen perennial. It can grow to 90cm tall and forms rosettes of dark green, oblong shaped leaves. Large sprays of yellow-green flowers emerge from the rosettes in April to June. Euphorbias are not fussy – they don’t require any feeding so long as the conditions they are growing in are correct. However, having said that, they do like to be mulched annually. Contrary to how most succulents behave, Euphorbia do not deal with long droughts very well. It is best to water them every week during the summer or whenever the top few inches of soil are dry. Don’t let the plants sit in wet soil as this can cause root rot! Euphorbias like to be in dappled, partial, or full shade. In late summer or early autumn, you should cut the flowering shoots down to ground level. Euphorbia sometimes have trouble with aphids, and grey mould can be a problem.

     

    The plants in this group all have a poisonous, milky, latex-like sap; this means gardeners must always wear gloves with this plant. 

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