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BOTANICAL NAME

Digitalis x mertonensis

 

COMMON NAME

Foxglove

 

PLANT TYPE

Perennial

 

FAMILY

Plantaginaceae

 

PLANT HEIGHT

3L pot

Eventual height and spread  75 cm - 30 cm

 

FEEDING

1-inch layer of compost in early spring helps encourage good growth

 

WATERING

Moist but not constantly soaked soil

 

LIGHT CONDITIONS

Dappled Shade, Full Shade, Full Sun, Partial Shade

 

PRUNING

Wait until foxgloves are finished flowering in spring or summer

 

PEST

Aphids and leaf and bud Eelworm

 

DISEASES

Fungal leaf spots, Powdery mildews, Downy mildews, Crown rots and Root rots

 

SOIL

Moist but well-drained

 

TYPE

Exterior

Digitalis x mertonensis

£13.70Price
Excluding Sales Tax
  • Digitalis can be biennials or short-lived perennials. They form a perfect rosette of simple leaves with bell-shaped flowers. The best-known species is the Common Foxglove, Digitalis purpurea, which is regularly grown as an ornamental addition to your garden.

     

    It has large, vivid flowers which range in colour from purple tones through to pink, and even to pure white. To make these flowers even more interesting, some have different spots and marks on them. Other favourite species of Digitalis for gardens are D. ferruginea, D. grandiflora, D. lutea and D. parviflora. Digitalis x mertonensis has the tall spike that are typical of large Foxglove flowers but in an unusual, gorgeous, blush-pink shade. These plants grow well, and they look best when placed in similar spots to traditional Foxgloves, such as in woodland clearings or in amongst shrubs and trees. Digitalis can be short lived, often treated as biennials. If you wish to extend their life, you can lift clumps and divide them up each year after they have flowered, but you must then replant in well prepared soil. To keep these plants happy, you want to add a 1-inch layer of compost and spread it all around the plant in early spring; this will help encourage good growth. You need to be careful because excess nitrogen will encourage foliage growth which will limit the growth of the flowers so make sure you fertilise in early spring with small amounts of slow-release fertiliser. Foxgloves enjoy moist soil, but they don’t want to be constantly soaked. During dry periods in the summer, you need supply extra water when there isn’t at least 1 inch of rainfall. However, if the plant gets too much water it can get crown rot which can kill the plant.

     

    Once the Foxgloves have finished flowering you should remove any brown parts of the plant by cutting the stem just above the leaves to stimulate new green growth. This plant should not be ingested. These plants are not safe to have around pets and babies.

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